Blog Archives

The recipe for additive innovation

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By Dale Dougherty, founder of Make: magazine and creator of Maker Faire.

The maker culture might not be something totally new, but recently, and thanks to the advancements made in the technological sector, more and more people are applying a kind of do-it-yourself strategies in areas like electronics, robotics and 3D printing. The resulting products are usually open to improvements and modifications by users, since all the information is commonly available on the Net. Coiner of the term “Web 2.0” and founder of Make: magazine, Dale Dougherty kindly agreed to share with us his views on the maker revolution. You can check his reflections in the short video below. We would like to thank the 4 Years From Now event for this contribution.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014

Benevolent Dictators, Killer Apps and Peer-to-Peer: A True Match?

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By Peter Troxler, research professor at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences and owner of Square One.

In my lectures on the Third Industrial Revolution I usually depict the capitalist as the iconic agent of the first industrial revolution, the management consultant as the one of the second and the maker as the one of the third. In my thinking the maker is not Make: magazine‘s Randian hero but rather the collective peer-producer. But sometimes I wonder if this is just wishful thinking.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014

Peer production and the opportunities and struggles of constructing a more humane production system

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By Yochai Benkler, professor, Harvard Law School; and faculty co-director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society

Commons-based production generally, and commons-based peer production in particular, are the most important and surprising organizational innovation to have emerged in networked economy and society. Surprising, because throughout the 20th century our intellectual frame for understanding production was dominated by a binary vision: state and market. By the end of the last century, we had shifted from a view of state- and managerial-hierarchy-based production as dominant to a view of market- or decentralized price-based organization as the dominant model.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014
About the Question
How many peers does it take to change a light bulb?

Systems like Linux and websites like Wikipedia are paradigmatic of a particular way of open collaboration known as peer production. Peer producers choose their tasks freely and coordinate their work using open digital platforms. They share the fruits of their labour as part of a global commons, and everyone works according to their abilities and benefits according to their needs.

Is this an emerging form of communism? Or the future of liberal capitalism? Or is it simply a new mode of production? In this blog we want to explore both the benefits and the downsides of such way of working.

UOC/IN3 degrees