Blog Archives

Blockchain technology: a new (r)evolution in the digital economy

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By Primavera De Filippi, researcher, Centre d’Études et de Recherches de Science Administrative, CNRS-Université Paris II.

Remember the world, back in the 90’s? Before the Internet had invaded pretty much every aspect of our lives? It was back then quite difficult — if not impossible — to foresee that one day, not too far away, people would be able to communicate directly with one another, that they would be able to broadcast themselves to the world and interact in a peer-to-peer fashion, bypassing most of the intermediaries of that time.

This marked the beginning of a new paradigm shift in the way people communicate — the beginning of a digital revolution characterised by a process of decentralization and disintermediation. With the Internet, traditional media operators, such as publishers and broadcasters, have been progressively displaced by a more distributed network of players, relying on emerging information and communication technologies in order to provide new opportunities for people to receive and impart information.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014

Providing new sources of trust

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By Javier Creus, founder of Ideas for Change and Pentagrowth.

An entrepreneur and specialist in collaborative economy, Javier Creus believes it takes more than one to change the light bulb, but gathering around one thousand peers working collaboratively might be enough to achieve a lot of things. According to him, organisations based in peer-to-peer alternatives can lead to new sources of trust and augmented resilience, but they eventually may have to deal with the complexity rise and effort sustaining over time. Watch the short video below to get his complete reflections on the topic. This contribution was possible thanks to the kind collaboration of the Ouishare Fest Barcelona event.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014

The citizen producer at the epicenter of the P2P revolution

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By Albert Cañigueral, founder of ConsumoColaborativo and OuiShare Connector in Barcelona (Spain).

Platforms are eating the world

Never before in human history has been as simple as today to coordinate peers at a massive scale. Jeremy Heimans calls it the “new power” and we see new power all around us. Wikipedia is a prime example of this.

The same basic capabilities are applied to the co-creation and exchange of, not only information, but goods, services, money, value, etc. Sharing economy, collaborative consumption, collaborative economy, p2p economy, etc. you can pick your favorite term to describe this scenario where people are empowered to get directly what they need from each other. Traditional businesses are being disrupted by coordinated collaboration among the people formerly known as “customers”. The genie is clearly out of the bottle and won’t be put back anytime soon.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014

Benevolent Dictators, Killer Apps and Peer-to-Peer: A True Match?

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By Peter Troxler, research professor at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences and owner of Square One.

In my lectures on the Third Industrial Revolution I usually depict the capitalist as the iconic agent of the first industrial revolution, the management consultant as the one of the second and the maker as the one of the third. In my thinking the maker is not Make: magazine‘s Randian hero but rather the collective peer-producer. But sometimes I wonder if this is just wishful thinking.

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Posted in Open Thoughts 2014
About the Question
How many peers does it take to change a light bulb?

Systems like Linux and websites like Wikipedia are paradigmatic of a particular way of open collaboration known as peer production. Peer producers choose their tasks freely and coordinate their work using open digital platforms. They share the fruits of their labour as part of a global commons, and everyone works according to their abilities and benefits according to their needs.

Is this an emerging form of communism? Or the future of liberal capitalism? Or is it simply a new mode of production? In this blog we want to explore both the benefits and the downsides of such way of working.

UOC/IN3 degrees